Interactive Read Aloud Quick Guide
 

My goal is to infuse you with tools to empower you as a parent and educator. Yes, we know we need to read to our students, but did you know how you read to preschool and kindergarten students can help narrow the achievement gap?

Here’s a quick guide to read alouds

  • Repeated Readings- Choose a book tied to your unit of study and reread it 4-5 times in a week.

  • Draw attention to print - This is a big one! Choose 4-8 quick prompts that draw your students’ attention to print. Here are some examples:

    • Can you point to where I start reading on this page? (This helps students read left to right)

    • Can you find the first letter on the page

    • Where is there a letter c on this page? Is there another letter c?

    • What is the first letter in the word bat? Yes, b is the first letter. B says /b/

    • At the end of a page ask, What word do I read next?

  • Vocabulary + Print Knowledge - Reading and talking about the text builds vocabulary. Drawing a student’s attention to print builds phonological awareness (how sounds work in words). Students need both vocabulary and phonological awareness to develop their reading skills.

 

 

 
HOW TO CREATE WRITING STRATEGY GROUPS AS EARLY AS KINDERGARTEN
 

My goal is to infuse you with tools to empower you as an educator. We did this in kindergarten last week and, you guys, it was super effective and so much fun. I definitely recommend doing this with a teaching partner to elevate the joy and effectiveness. A quick glance through student writing samples shows you where they are and how to take them one step further as a writer:

  • Grab the rubric you use to score writing- quickly read over the rubric to refresh your memory about 5 specific skills your students need to learn.

  • Create a chart - Simply divide a blank piece of paper into 6-9 sections. As you look through the stack of papers you will notice what students can do compared to what is listed on the rubric. The skills will naturally increase in complexity. List student names under the skill they need to learn next.

    • Planning their opinion piece

    • Complete sentences

    • Sentence variety (not every sentence starts with the or I like)

    • Add details

    • Spaces between words

    • Phonetic and sight word spelling

  • Plan strategies - I love Jennifer Serravallo’s Writing Strategies book to help me choose fun strategies aligned to each skill. This goal - skill - strategy system ensures a clear connection between what you teach and why you’re teaching it. Now you have a clear plan for meeting with strategy groups. You are going to feel so accomplished when you’ve met with your groups, knowing you’ve given each student exactly what they need without feeling you need to have individual teaching conferences each day.

 

"IF YOU CAN NAME IT, YOU CAN CLAIM IT"

-ROBIN ARZON

 

 
HOW TO READ AT HOME TO CREATE A CLEAR MAP TO SCHOOL READING SUCCESS
 

A map exists between home and school literacy. The more similar the home and school experiences, the greater support for developing strong literacy skills. Reading with a child supports positive feelings towards literacy. A few simple steps improve reading success by creating a clearer map between home and school:

  • Connect with the text - when reading, link the content of the book or text to an experience in the child's life.

  • Repeated readings - read a favorite book at least five times to build vocabulary and engagement.

  • Interact with the text - draw a child's eyes and attention to interesting letters, sounds, pictures, and words. Try taking a picture walk to talk about the book before reading it. Expand on parts your child notices with complete sentences.

 

"We can only succeed if we recognize that education is
an organic system, not a mechanical one."

Sir Ken Robinson